The Minority/ Black Health Blog  

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Rapper Heavy D Died From DVT Back in 2011 -- Find Out What It Is and If You Too Are At Risk!

Heavy D died from DVT

90's rapper Heavy D died back in 2011 from Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) at the young age of 44, and according to the Office of Minority Health at the Dept of Health and Human Services, African Americans overall have a significantly higher risk of developing this potentially deadly condition. One major risk factor is sitting or inactivity for a long time. Some like to say that too much time on the DVD can lead to DVT!

What is DVT?

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a muscle, generally in the legs, but also in your arms, chest, or other areas of your body. The danger with DVT is that the blood clot can block your circulation or lodge in a blood vessel in your lungs, heart, or other area. This can result in severe organ damage and even death within hours.

What causes DVT?

Major surgery such as hip or knee surgery can increase the risk of DVT. Other risks include child birth, an injury, cancer, and a history of heart attack, stroke, or congestive heart failure. In addition, a sedentary life of inactivity, smoking, and obesity also increase the risk of DVT.

African Americans at increased risk

According to the Office of Minority Health at the Department of Health and Human Services, African Americans have a 30 percent greater risk of DVT and than whites. The reasons are not clear, but more education about DVT can help prevent many of the increased risks for African Americans and prevent more deaths from DVT.

For more information on DVT and its risks for African American, visit:
www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=196
DISCLAIMER: The content or opinions expressed on this web site are not to be interpreted as medical advice. Please consult with your doctor or medical practitioner before utilizing any suggestions on this web site.



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